Here’s your pharmacist resume checklist

Have you been stuck in retail pharmacy for too long and want to explore other options? Did you come across a pharmacist job opening that intrigues you? Are you in the middle of a relocation? Are you a new graduate looking to enter the work force?  There are numerous reasons why you may be looking to update your current resume. Here is a checklist to make sure your new pharmacist resume sizzles:

  1. Make sure your resume has a position title. This is a necessity from a searchability standpoint as well as making things more organized for the reader. Simply stating “Pharmacist” is far too generic. Be more specific and make sure your title is cohesive with the position of interest. For example, something like “Inpatient Clinical Pharmacist” or “Pharmacy District Manager” would be more clear and, frankly, powerful.
  2. Does your resume have a professional summary that conveys your most impressive qualifications? And is it tailored trxeliteresumes Logo RRo the area of practice you are seeking?  Make sure it can be found at the very top of the resume. Avoid fluff and generic wording and flesh out your story with tangible examples of your expertise.
  3. Define what is your greatest asset and emphasize that. If you’re an older pharmacist, you will want to emphasize your vast experience. If you are a new graduate and completed a residency, your resume should tilt toward your education.
  4. Is your resume easy to read? Remember, hiring managers are more likely to scan over your resume rather than read it in detail. Therefore, utilize bullet points rather than drawn out paragraphs. Ensure there is adequate white space. Use 10-11 point font and either Times New Roman or Calibri font. Use the same font throughout the resume.
  5. Is your resume between 2-3 pages? Don’t listen to anyone who tells you your pharmacist resume should fit on one page. Unless you use 2 point font that simply isn’t feasible. A good rule of thumb is 2-3 pages in length.
  6. Make sure your resume only includes relevant information. Hobbies and personal info including gender and race are inappropriate.
  7. It is generally best practice to include your past 15 years of work history only. If there is relevant work history beyond 15 years, there are ways to capture this without subjecting yourself to age discrimination. Email me and I can show you how! Again, previous positions before you became a pharmacist are likely irrelevant and shouldn’t be included. Instead, focus on your internships in scshutterstock_136773590hool if needed.
  8. Does your resume look and read well on a mobile phone? Test it! Email it to yourself and take a look at it on your phone. If it looks strange, then you need to make sure you are using the PDF version when emailing it to people.
  9. Make sure you are quantifying your impact as much as possible. For example, you didn’t just monitor patients INR levels and Coumadin dosing daily. You monitored INR levels and managed dosing adjustments for 100+ patients monthly on Coumadin leading to a 25% decrease in GI bleeds and Vitamin K utilization. See the difference? Your resume is your professional story, and stories are always better with more detail.
  10. Don’t forget the spelling and grammar check!

Now you’re ready to send out your pharmacist resume with confidence! I’m happy to take a look at your resume personally and provide my thoughts and recommendations. Contact me here for more information.

 

Garrett Brown is a practicing Clinical Pharmacist, Certified Professional Resume Writer, and President at RXelite Resumes. RXelite Resumes specializes in writing impactful and interview-landing resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles for pharmacists. Contact Garrett and his team now to learn more.